Displaying my fine-art prints soon in Eagle River

I have the pleasure to announce that during March, I’ll be displaying my fine-art photography prints at Jitters Coffee House in Eagle River, Alaska — “Where Coffee is an Art.”  Their coffee really is excellent!

Here is a write-up on the coffee house:

From: kaylene.us…

Coffee Shop Chronicles

I walked into Jitters for the first time on a cold February night in 1994. I was met at the door with the deep aroma of freshly ground coffee. Inside, the old pub feel of the mahogany bar offered a sense of warmth and welcome. Older folks chatted quietly at vintage wooden tables, while younger people played Scrabble.  A few book lovers wrapped themselves in a cup of java and a good read. Jitters was clearly a multi-generational place to gather.  And I thought to myself, “This is what community looks like.”

Entire Article Here

And here is a bio of Jitters’ owner, Dennis Johnson and overview of his gallery/gift shop, next door.

This should be fun! This is my debut!

By the way, none of the photos I’ll be displaying have been posted on the web. Perhaps I’ll give a little online preview before the show.

Jeff : )

4 thoughts on “Displaying my fine-art prints soon in Eagle River

  1. Maxine Vehlow

    Also agree that it will be a pleasure to see you pics displayed. How many pics do you anticipate that you will hang? Also are you just going to put
    them on that board or matt them to hang. Framing would be way too expensive so wouldn’t advise that. Is it just going to be your work or your work with a lot of others? Either which way will be good and great to launch at a notable place. Maxine

    1. Jeff Fenske

      Maxine,

      Well, this is more fun to write than what I just commented on at ONEcanhappen. Thanks!

      If I print them at 24×36, maybe a dozen. But I’ll probably mix up the sizes a bit.

      After a couple of years of agonizing research, it looks like most of the prints will probably be mounted on 1/2 inch, black Gatorboard, and sprayed with PremierArt spray, which has been tested by Wilhelm Research to not yellow and approximately double the life of the print.

      In Carmel, I really liked how one photographer used a smaller wood frame behind the print to make it look like it’s suspended from the wall by about 1.5 inches. It would be extra work, but it might be a nice touch.

      It looks like I’m going to have to do the spraying too, which I really had hoped not to, but I’ve heard that Osha makes it very difficult for businesses to do hazmat procedures. I have to figure out what kind of mask to use.

      And by the way, even John Paul Caponigro sprays many of his super expensive prints with this spray.

      My prints will be in the main area where people by their espressos. There is another room off to the side where mine won’t be displayed.

      : )

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