Red cedar looks outstanding!

Preserving wood with fire!

– –

Bois Brulé. Burnt wood, an alternative to aging … according to ancestral techniques came from Japan for giving a durable finish to wood siding. The ancient technique of charring the wood to make it more durable is rooted among the Aztecs. The Japanese, who named it Shou-sugi-ban, have extensively used it. The charcoal acts as a protective layer that resists decay and fire, producing a long-lasting and maintenance-free material. This method of wood preservation is restarted by architects looking for green solutions in different parts of the world including Japan and Europe. In simple terms, the wood is burned for about 7 minutes using a torch or more traditional methods, before being doused with water and brushed to remove char dust, revealing a light silvery sheen. The timber is then washed and dried. It can be left unfinished or a finished oil can be applied to bring out shades of gray, silver, black or brown. This technique is used for siding, decking and outdoor furniture. The method earns interest both for its environmental history and for its aesthetic appearance. The materials can last at least 80 years, without chemicals. (YouTube comment)

Japanese technique of preserving/antiquing wood “Shou-sugi-ban Yakisugi 焼き杉”

Published on Jun 9, 2014

Bit customized Japanese technique of preserving/antiquing wood “Shou-sugi-ban Yakisugi 焼き杉”. The oil used for final finish is tung oil.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *